From ERP to Infrastructure Resource Planning.

Ever since the Internet took off, those who have been managing the infrastructure have been laser focused on optimizing each and every part of the “stack” leading up to and stopping short of the application (another post on this one as that is about to change!!!).  In so doing this, the largest of players have tuned their datacenter energy consumption thru quantification via Power Utilization Effectiveness/Efficiency (PUE), have sought to push the HW vendors to tune the servers we deploy in the datacenters via efforts like Open Compute Project (just attended recent event), and the industry has more robust contribution to the ever evolving set(s) of industry mgmt standards that are common across MOST infrastructure teams (see ITILv3.0).

What is not, however, all that common is an over-arching view (process map) to tie this universe from end to end – DCIM adoption has been slow due to not only this lack of cohesive visibility but also to advance our abilities to even further tune the “infrastructure engine”, we need to begin to holistically look at infrastructure the way in which manufactures have long done via Enterprise Resource Planning – I posit, we need to adopt Infrastructure Resource Planning (IRP) as a way in which to advance the concepts of ITIL + ITSM + DCIM + (soon to be published, new metric!!).

Spot on article – well written and good perspective!

Gigaom

When I founded my own startup, I thought I knew what I was getting into: after all, I had been a senior manager at eBay (s EBAY), managing director at Gumtree and chief operating officer at Zoopla. But since starting Adzuna in 2011, I’ve realized that being a founder can be very, very different. Here are some things I’ve learned in the past two years.

Learning to sell

As a finance guy who became a general manager, I’ve always been driven by strategy, product and marketing, and never valued sales. Sales was something I looked down on — a commodity role staffed by poorly qualified “liars for hire”, something you didn’t need if you had good product and marketing, or a necessary evil to get the word out.

As a founder, I sell every day, to investors, to staff, to the government, but also to customers, so that we can…

View original post 851 more words